Overcoming Buyer’s Remorse - The Plan

 

There has been absolutely one top priority since we moved into our new house last November.  Our company and our amazing followers. But, now that summer is really here I’ve been more lenient with myself on weekends. Instead of working through them I’ve spent the last few dreaming. I’ve formed a plan on how we can realistically take on our house woes while still staying focused on everything that owning a small business requires daily. 

Here’s the plan. 

We found this mantel at an amazing local architectural salvage store. We gave the owner the dimensions of our fireplace insert and he took us around the whole store. Two buildings and nothing fit. Then he remembered this was in the back of his pick up and it fit PERFECTLY. I think it was fate because he  hadn't even pulled it out of his truck to  he clean it up for sale yet.  We didn't paint or refinish it. Every scrape tells the story of it's journey to our home. We LOVE that about it.

We found this mantel at an amazing local architectural salvage store. We gave the owner the dimensions of our fireplace insert and he took us around the whole store. Two buildings and nothing fit. Then he remembered this was in the back of his pick up and it fit PERFECTLY. I think it was fate because he  hadn't even pulled it out of his truck to  he clean it up for sale yet.  We didn't paint or refinish it. Every scrape tells the story of it's journey to our home. We LOVE that about it.

 

1.) Keep the walls, change the colors & textures. 

Typically, when we tell friends we are redecorating a room they’ve learned to assume it involves demo and rebuilding. Believe me, there are areas in this house where that is certainly tempting. However, for the most part, we are going to focus on keeping a lot of what is already there, and layer textures, textiles, and color throughout the space that represent our style in a way that can be achieved on a weekend or even after work when we can manage.

We found this bold toss pillow and loved how detailed the embroidery was. Down to the little tassel, I loved it. I have some future plans to incorporate some aspects of this pillow into other designs for P&W, too.  

We found this bold toss pillow and loved how detailed the embroidery was. Down to the little tassel, I loved it. I have some future plans to incorporate some aspects of this pillow into other designs for P&W, too.  

 

2.) Buy great quality things ONE time. 

I think it is very easy to get distracted from what truly speaks to your design soul when we’re constantly flooded with trendy designs that come and go. I know I’ve been guilty in the past of settling for what might be easy to access and less expensive at a big box store. 

My new motto is this: Ignore design trends. Listen to my gut. Buy quality when my mind is truly made up. 

We've cheaped out on furniture before. It fell apart and we ended up having to re-buy it just a few years later. When we bought our new living room set with a bonus check for Steve's hard work at his day job, we went with pieces we knew would last. This ottoman is two years old and still in great shape. We had our old furniture not much longer when it looked sad and saggy. Paying more for quality living room furniture that we knew we would use every day totally paid off. 

We've cheaped out on furniture before. It fell apart and we ended up having to re-buy it just a few years later. When we bought our new living room set with a bonus check for Steve's hard work at his day job, we went with pieces we knew would last. This ottoman is two years old and still in great shape. We had our old furniture not much longer when it looked sad and saggy. Paying more for quality living room furniture that we knew we would use every day totally paid off. 

I don’t even want to know how much we've spent over the years on seasonal trends that aren’t great quality only to hate them two months later. That ends now. It’s wasteful and ridiculous. If we see something and love it, we now refuse to care if it’s what is popular.

There were old books and knick-knacks from my Grandma's house in boxes from before our last move. When she downsized, I ended up saving a great deal knowing I'd love to decorate with them at some point. I found the trick of filtering through 100+ years of storage was being able to filter through it all to keep the items that were quality and make us feel good. Happy memories are triggered by so many of the items in our house and that's exactly how your own house should feel. 

There were old books and knick-knacks from my Grandma's house in boxes from before our last move. When she downsized, I ended up saving a great deal knowing I'd love to decorate with them at some point. I found the trick of filtering through 100+ years of storage was being able to filter through it all to keep the items that were quality and make us feel good. Happy memories are triggered by so many of the items in our house and that's exactly how your own house should feel. 

There's nothing better than a gas range that gets your excited to cook or a truly soft and quality statement rug. Things like that are what we're taking our time to find. If that means saving up to buy this time around then that's what we're going to do. Taking our time also makes us slow down and really think about what we want each piece of a room to really look like in the end and not settle for something that KIND OF works. 

When we decided to buy a new stove we wanted gas. We had settled for electric in our old home and there's just nothing like a good gas range. Maybe we're crazy but we feel like you can taste a difference in the food. This is definitely one of the largest investments to our new home that we've made but we plan to have this stove a VERY long time and know that it will last.

When we decided to buy a new stove we wanted gas. We had settled for electric in our old home and there's just nothing like a good gas range. Maybe we're crazy but we feel like you can taste a difference in the food. This is definitely one of the largest investments to our new home that we've made but we plan to have this stove a VERY long time and know that it will last.

 

3.) Our house is our home, not a hotel. 

We need to make our spaces personal. Modeling our home after a hotel room or stock photo that is meant to appeal to the masses disconnects us from the space. We will fill these spaces with personal quirky items regardless if they “match” perfectly or appeal to the tastes of everyone that comes to visit. We get a lot of family and friends who come to stay for long periods of time. We used to make the whole house more "neutral" so that everyone we love who spends time here felt comfortable. Although we absolutely want them to still feel comfortable we have decided to stop tip-toeing around bold colors or "weird" art in order to do so. They love us, they don't care. It was silly to think that mattered, to begin with. 

This wall is filled with items we've collected from our family's past. Such as a Veterinary Diploma from my Great Grandfather, a morse code tapper from Steve's Great Grandpa, Tools from family stone masons, and My Grandma and Grandpa's wedding announcement and coverage from the local paper.

This wall is filled with items we've collected from our family's past. Such as a Veterinary Diploma from my Great Grandfather, a morse code tapper from Steve's Great Grandpa, Tools from family stone masons, and My Grandma and Grandpa's wedding announcement and coverage from the local paper.

 

4.)Use what we already have & love.

Nothing is more personal that the items we have that remind us of the people we love. We are lucky enough to have a great deal of our family's heirlooms. We're refusing to tuck them away because they don't match our current style. Instead, we're making them the focal point of everything else that comes into our rooms because we know our love for them will withstand the test of time.

 

A full set of stunning Paul Revere Copper Pots was given to us by a family friend. To say we are honored she thought enough of us to pass down such an amazing family heirloom is an understatement. They are so loved and will ALWAY hang proudly in my kitchen. Copper is "trending" right now, but I have plans to show these off for the rest of forever! 

A full set of stunning Paul Revere Copper Pots was given to us by a family friend. To say we are honored she thought enough of us to pass down such an amazing family heirloom is an understatement. They are so loved and will ALWAY hang proudly in my kitchen. Copper is "trending" right now, but I have plans to show these off for the rest of forever! 

5.) Plants are important. 

Steve and I don’t ever feel quite as at home as when we have living plants and bouquets in the house. We plan to grow indoor plants year round and have started a cut flower garden bed to help us enjoy beautiful seasonal bouquets on the cheap during the warmer months. 

We try to keep fresh flowers and plants in each room of our home as often as possible.

We try to keep fresh flowers and plants in each room of our home as often as possible.

When NYS weather will allow we grow as much of our own food as we can. Really, it comes down to getting what is left after the bunnies, deer, and dogs eat it on us. But that's okay. We grow enough to share. haha.

When NYS weather will allow we grow as much of our own food as we can. Really, it comes down to getting what is left after the bunnies, deer, and dogs eat it on us. But that's okay. We grow enough to share. haha.

 

6.) Design for US and YOU.

As we go, we always think of pieces that we can’t find in any store that would be a statement piece for a room. Such as really great shelf brackets or tile. I’ve found that some of our most popular selling items were things we originally had a need for in our own lives. 

When that happens, we’re going to do our best to make them for both our home and yours and make them available on our web store. 

When ideas strike I have a tendency of drawing them on the nearest surface available. When Steve develops his hand-turned wood items, that little leg will make an appearance. 

When ideas strike I have a tendency of drawing them on the nearest surface available. When Steve develops his hand-turned wood items, that little leg will make an appearance. 

 

7.) Buy when we travel. 

NOT a plastic snow globe of the Statue of Liberty but something that is great quality and will last. For example, a print from a local artist or a flea market find from a far away town. That’s what we’re keep our eye out for. The objects in our home should all carry their own little story. Nothing is worse than not feeling a special connection when you look around at the items in your own house. 

 

We were lucky enough to be at the same event in Mississippi as a Tin Type photographer. We had him take our photo to fill in with our wall full of family memorabilia. It fits in so well people would don't know us might assume it's just another relic from the past.

We were lucky enough to be at the same event in Mississippi as a Tin Type photographer. We had him take our photo to fill in with our wall full of family memorabilia. It fits in so well people would don't know us might assume it's just another relic from the past.

8.) Use what we’re drawn to — in multiples. 

Naturally, I am drawn to antique china and fun eclectic dish ware. If it's handmade that's an even bigger selling point for me.  Steve has a fascination with antique tools. We plan to collect and incorporate both of those into the house as wall decor.

We accidentally already have an antique tool collection started. My great grandfather was a stone mason. When we were helping my grandma downsize we found his whole work chest full of AMAZING antique tools in her basement. SCORE. 

We accidentally already have an antique tool collection started. My great grandfather was a stone mason. When we were helping my grandma downsize we found his whole work chest full of AMAZING antique tools in her basement. SCORE. 

 

 

So, That’s the plan moving forward. Now, I’ve got to get myself back into my studio where the wall decor always comes second to functionality and getting beautifully designed orders out on time! ;-)

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A tale of buyer's remorse... and how we're changing it.

 

If I had a blog a year ago, I could have posted grand remodeling stories of our 1900’s farm house. We renovated basically the entire place down to studs, moved some walls, re-routed plumbing, and even put in a salvaged clawfoot tub that I refinished by hand. It was my dream bathroom suite and had a lake view. But then, life happened.

Many weeks of our lives wen't into making this room a reality

Many weeks of our lives wen't into making this room a reality

For many reasons, we moved and reality hit hard. The real estate market was FIERCE. Our old home sold in a day and we had no idea how hard we would have to fight to find a new house. It was certainly a crazy seller’s market and all the beautiful old homes we found sold in a matter of hours. We didn't stand a chance and had no time to waste. The house we did find worked so well for our studio space and we saw what it COULD be. It was in the right area so we hurriedly signed on the dotted line. 

Ridiculous as it is, a little bit of panic and heartbreak set it. Nothing about my personality likes a “new” house. It sounds so silly to say, but old homes are immeshed down deep in my soul. I get a feeling of comfort and happiness from them that a new house just cannot fill. I know that I should just be happy to have a warm and safe roof over my head. I get that, I really do. But at the end of the day, I still have to live there and be inspired there in order to make my business and personal life thrive so I can pay it forward. So, I guess that’s how I will shamelessly justify my fussiness for housing and decor. I’m a Taurus, who inherently likes the finer things in life and it simply can’t be helped.

The house we bought is very much a relic of 1970s suburbia with updates but not in our style or any particular style for that matter. The house didn’t feel like it knew what it wanted to be. Like it didn't have a clue what it was. A little bit of 70s here... a little bit of 90s there ... After our first night there I told Steve that I felt like I had spent the night in someone else’s home. I should also mention that on the first night we slept in a room that the previous owner had painted HOT PINK AND ZEBRA print that made sunglasses indoors at night seem very appropriate. The silver lining was that it worked so well for my day-to-day studio life which I desperately needed in order to make my growing business work. I thought it would be amusing to share with you the photos of the house as it was left for us at move in. For those friends who are interior designers, I beg you to forgive me for the graphic content you're about to encounter. 

I cannot imagine that I am only one who has had this feeling. So I am going to share with you how I am overcoming my buyer’s remorse by stopping the ridiculous and quiet pity party. This is where I will document everything we do to transform it into a house that we actually see ourselves living in for a long time. This section of our blog is going to be all about being grateful for what we have in our home and making it our own. Its going to be real and a real work in progress. This isn’t something we’re taking a loan out for or a rapid renovation project. It’s the day-to-day, still got bills to pay, take it in slow stride approach to claiming our space. We are deliberately taking our time to find the right things to make our house feel like home. We refuse to continue to buy and re-buy “on trend” decor that doesn't truly speak to our souls or feel personal. There won’t be a grand reveal of each room. I plan to post as we transform our spaces with creativity, antique finds, and thoughtful family mementos. If for no other reason than to remind myself to be grateful for the amazing home and life that I am so fortunate to share with the people I love. 

 

To Laurel, with love.

It has been a really long time since we did a blog post. Things have been crazy and for that I am sorry. I knew before we left that our road trip to Laurel would be something different and would be great to document. But now, back in my own living room I struggle to really find the words I need to tell you about our experience. 

We went to Laurel with basically no expectations. We had no idea what to anticipate. But, I can tell you with absolute certainty that I could have never predicted what it was really like. 

I bet this is where you’re expecting me to start talking about Ben & Erin and HGTV. Well, about that I’ll say very little. Except this: 

Ben and Erin are truly just as wonderful in real life. They are kind, humble, and hard working. I give them and all the families from the series so much credit for throwing themselves into the crazy spotlight of national television to help bring attention and value to the small town that they love. We are more than honored to work with all the partners and team at Laurel Mercantile Co.

But here is the thing, that town… is FILLED with amazing stories and people. The excitement and dedication they have for Laurel is palpable. They pop up all over in the most unassuming and casual way. They’re throwing everything into their passions to make Laurel shine. Their enthusiasm is contagious. I am going to tell you about my experiences with some of them. 

Joseph & Jamie of Sweet Somethings - 

www.sweetsomethingsbakery.com

I am so glad that I found Sweet Somethings Bed & Breakfast before anyone else snatched up the reservation. The 16 ft ceilings, brick walls, and original hardwood flooring are just the type of character that I can’t resist. However, the best part about the B&B is definitely the owners. Joseph & Jamie are so fun to talk to! They have such love for their family, town, and businesses. Like many people we met, they’re incredibly hard working. Owning a bakery seems glamorous but I know the long hours and hard work it takes to get things to taste like Jamie can! Steve ate the entire box of cookies they gave us himself. It was so great to get a glimpse into how they work together to make all of their Laurel businesses and projects come together in such a beautiful way. 

Adam & Lily Trest of Adam Trest Home

www.adamtrest.com

Adam’s textiles had caught my eye on instagram long before I visited Laurel. I made sure to seek out the store when we got into town. Like many of the shops in Laurel, their beautiful storefront seemed to serve two purposes. To showcase their style and as a really great spot to hang out and talk with your friends. We were lucky enough to have a great long talk during our visit. I’m pretty picky ( like really picky ) about prints that I’d actually be willing to use in my own home. For me, Adam & Lily’s really shine. They bring the heritage and landmarks of Laurel into their design work in such a natural and timeless way. They even carry a bee print textile. You know from my own work how much I love bees!

Michael Foster ( honorary Laurel resident and kick butt tintype expert )

michaelnfoster.com

Michael lives outside of Laurel but I think its a safe bet to say if you asked anyone he’s got an honorary citizenship there. He is insanely talented in Tintype and Amber Plate Photography and is the most chill guy to talk with. His passion and knowledge of historic photography is remarkable and he always takes his time with the people he photographs. He says that the stories and characters behind each of his photos are his favorite thing about the process. It was clear that if he could spend all his days talking and taking photos of everyone he finds interesting it. would make him very happy. We think that’s pretty fantastic. 

 

Alyson - Manager of Laurel Mercantile

Alyson is awesome. She was immediately welcoming and makes you feel at home. She gave recommendations for places to eat ( gf in small towns can be a challenge ) and greeted us like an old friend every time we saw her.  If I didn’t live 1,000 miles away I would probably follow her around her until she agreed to be best friends or called the police, lol. Just kidding, I usually hide in my own house most days but if I did venture out to talk to someone Alyson would be at the top of the list. From all I could tell, she works insanely hard to make sure the whole Laurel team have their bases covered and things go smoothly. She's just one of those people who makes you feel like part of the team from the instant you show up. 

Their are so many other amazing people doing big things in Laurel, too. Like the fantastic new Guild & Gentry, Laurel Leaf, and Lee’s Coffee & Tea. It really is like stepping into a great novel. Except the “characters” are real and so much better than could ever be made up. They partner with each other and work together. It seems that they all have a quiet understanding that doing so is how they’ll all help to give Laurel the comeback that it deserves. The main thing I experienced with all of them is that they are inclusive. They want everyone to join in and work together. They get people excited to take on new projects and challenges. At the end, I think that's one of the more important things to remember. We're all just same. We dream, live our daily lives, and fight to have those dreams come true. Working together makes those dreams a lot closer to reality than trying to go it alone. So get out there and collaborate. We're not each other's competition or source of entertainment. We are each other's greatest allies if we put in the hard work and allow it to be so.

We absolutely love our own little home town in New York. But now, there is a special spot  dedicated to Laurel in our hearts as well. 

 

 

Weekend Adventure: Lamberton Conservatory

Let me start this post by saying that admission for this place is the best $3 I've ever spent. 

After winter storm Stella brought her wrath down on Rochester everyone has been pretty cooped up for the better part of a week. I needed some warm air, sun, and flowers to keep me going. Short of a plane ticket south, this is the best way I could think to spend my morning. Besides, I figured that a bunch of you North-Easterners were probably feeling the same way. I've snapped some photos to share with this post in hopes of brightening everyone up a bit! For my southern friends, we are envious. Also, I bet at least half of us are booking flights to come visit you right now. We apologize in advance for the tourist mayhem this causes. We're cold and crazy. Please forgive us.

I found this image on the Lamberton Conservatory website. Look at all those fancy clothes!

I found this image on the Lamberton Conservatory website. Look at all those fancy clothes!

Lamberton Conservatory was built in 1911 in homage to Alexander B. Lamberton by his relatives. Lamberton was the President of the Parks Board from 1902 - 1915. The addition of the conservatory during his presidency further boosted Highland Park's already nationally renown horticulture status. It also gives me a warm and cozy place to be with nature in the dead of Rochester's winter. So thank you for that, too Mr. Lamberton. 

I had never been to the Conservatory before today. Living so much closer to downtown makes amazing places like this so much more accessible during day-to-day life. I'm quite happy to be close to it. I wasn't sure what to expect when I arrived, but I wasn't disappointed. 

It might sound crazy, but being close to living plants and nature makes me calmer, happier and an overall better human. There is something intangible but incredibly good for the soul near nature. I've felt stressed out and disconnected since the weather got bad this week. Sitting in the conservatory gardens while listening to the waterfalls and watching the quail wobble around the cobblestone paths totally cured me of those feelings. Leaving, I felt like I could breath again for the first time in awhile. It didn't even phase me that I was walking past giant snow banks on my way back to the car. I was lighter and I was happy. 

Believe it or not, there is science to back up the feeling of "peace" and "wholeness" I felt after spending time in the garden. There are many studies that have shown that gardening and spending time in nature can significantly improve your physical and mental well-being. From Alzheimer's and depression, to heart disease and cancer, there are correlations between time spent near nature and risk reduction. So, for those of you who are close to Rochester and dreaming of spring, I highly suggest grabbing three dollars and heading over to the Lamberton Conservatory at Highland Park this weekend. It is beautiful, peaceful, and good for you! Not bad for only 12 quarters! Tell Lucky, the wonderful and rather pampered queen duck that I say hi. 

This is Lucky the Duck. She is the self-proclaimed Queen of Lamberton Conservatory. She pushed my leg out of the way. It was impeding her preferred route to the pond. She's fabulous... and knows it. 

This is Lucky the Duck. She is the self-proclaimed Queen of Lamberton Conservatory. She pushed my leg out of the way. It was impeding her preferred route to the pond. She's fabulous... and knows it. 

For more information about hours and directions: http://www2.monroecounty.gov/parks-conservatory

Weekend Adventure: The Eastman Museum

There is no doubt that the history of George Eastman and the Kodak Company are deeply engrained in Rochester. Ghosts of its former glory are scattered throughout the city if you take a second to look for them. Nowhere is that more evident than the Eastman Kodak Museum. Built at the estate of George Eastman, it is a tribute and continued educational effort in honor of the ground-breaking life's work of Eastman himself. 

Exterior of Main Home

Driving down East Ave in Rochester is always a treat for me. No matter how many times I slowly creep down the street the beautiful architecture and giant estate homes draw me in. There is so much history and you can just feel it in every hand-carved arch and hand-laid brick. I've been meaning to visit the Eastman Museum for years. Driving by on my way to other places, I would make a mental note to stop. Finally, when I saw the Dutch Connection event coming to a close this weekend it was the final push to get me there. 

Each year from fall to early spring, George Eastman would fill his estate with various varieties of dutch flowers rotating them as the winter progressed into spring. The Dutch Connection event recreates his annual indoor flower garden from his original 100 year old order. Unfortunately, almost all of the species from his original list are now extinct. They've been replaced with varieties of tulip, daffodil, hyacinth, and amaryllis bulbs; freesia corms; and clivia, begonia, primrose, and azalea. I can imagine it was his way of bringing life into the dark and sometimes long Rochester winters. I certainly felt cheerier after spending time amongst the tulips. There is so much beauty to this idea. I truly believe that having living plants around your home are good for the soul.

 The potent and intoxicating smell of the blooms hit our noses the second we started down the main corridor into the Eastman estate from the museum entrance. It smelled like spring and it was wonderful. It was almost as if two worlds were combining down the long stretch of hallway. The natural world of fragrant floral blooms and the ritzy upper-class world that a poor boy from Waterville, NY had built for himself.

What we do during our working hours determines what we have; what we do in our leisure hours determines what we are. - George Eastman

Although the flowers themselves were beautiful, the entire estate was just as noteworthy and inspiring. Each tiny little detail was deliberate and crafted. The rooms transported me back in time. The architecture, textiles, wallpaper, carvings, and antique furnishings set the stage for life 100 years ago. They're also an amazing inspiration to pull into my ceramic work. 

It is funny to say, but I have some SERIOUS bathroom envy after visiting this amazing home. I also have a lot more inspiration for my own personal master suite face-lift that will eventually happen. 

Apart from the actual home, There are multiple gallery spaces within the attached museum full of vintage photo equipment, sensational remnants of the past, and a greater explanation and understanding for the craft and dedication of Eastman.

In the end, George Eastman donated more than $100 million to educational and arts institutions, public parks, hospitals, dental clinics, and charitable organizations around the world. He was a strong advocate for arts education as well as healthcare. He knew that if public appreciation for the arts continued alongside medical advancement that his company would continue long after his death and the entire Rochester community would benefit. At it's peak Eastman - Kodak employed 145,300 people. The peak for Rochester employment was in 1982 with a payroll of 60,400. Knowing how history has played out since is a little bitter-sweet but I think that it is safe to say his impact has certainly far surpassed his death.

Unlocking our muses...

Hey everyone, 

I have been talking with Steve for awhile now about how to bring relevant and interesting content from our everyday lives into our Potter & Woodsmith blog page. We really want everyone who visits our site and follows us to have an authentic and dynamic look into what drives our vision and inspiration. 

That being said, we're changing the way we structure and develop this section of our website. Along with a lot more studio posts, we're going to start talking about other hobbies, and areas of our life that both enrich and inspire our work. 

Those who know us personally, know how important our home environment is to us. We strongly believe in enriching the world around us and we do things everyday to help make that a reality in our lives and in the lives of those around us. When we aren't in the studio, it is very common for us to be renovating, decorating, gardening, antiquing, or striving for a more simple and natural home. We also love to travel and explore, even if it's just a local day trip. All of these muses immensely impact our functional art so It seems only natural to share them with you. Our hope is that this will help give you a more faceted idea of who we are and maybe even give you some fun ideas to try for yourself along the way.

We truly believe in the value of handcrafting as much of your life as possible. Whether by making it yourself or sourcing from an actual maker or artisan. We believe that new isn't always better, and keeping things simple and natural should be done as much as possible. We hope you all follow along as we explain exactly what that means for us. 

Cheers! 

Sara & Steve. 

The Look Back

 

When we started P&W nearly 4 years ago, our lives were much different. Reflecting back, It was probably the most challenging period of time we've yet encountered. We were isolated from our support system and frankly, pretty broke. But amid the rural lake landscape, we began sorting through everything that life had thrown at us. Then, something unexpected happened. We found ourselves. 

View from the picture window of our old home & studio. I shot most of the product photos here. 

View from the picture window of our old home & studio. I shot most of the product photos here. 

We couldn't have imagined what the next years would bring. We worked hard, both professionally and personally. We tirelessly renovated our old house and studio. Some may have considered it to be a giant money pit. It was originally meant to be a B&B next to the grape fields that the Finger Lakes are globally known for. The property was big, beautiful, took up all of our free time, not so expendable income, and energy to restore and maintain. Detached from any real sense of community, we both developed a strong sense of self both independently as well as within our young marriage. 

Canandaigua Lake as seen from our road. It was a hazy, but beautiful day. 

Canandaigua Lake as seen from our road. It was a hazy, but beautiful day. 

At a time with few options, we encouraged each other to focus on the dreams that we had prior believed only to be hobbies. These hobbies are what have since manifest into The Potter & Woodsmith. For that, we couldn't be more grateful for our past experiences. 

2016 brought many exciting changes and success. We have shifted over to selling both on our website, as well as with wholesale partners. We've relocated our entire business closer to Rochester, NY. We both have the studio and office space we desperately needed and don't spend our lives remodeling and repairing an old home. We will miss the views, hard work, and character that comes with an old home, but now we have the time to actually focus on what matters. 

Back to work in my new pottery studio. Unbelievably happy that we could expand.

Back to work in my new pottery studio. Unbelievably happy that we could expand.

Now that we are settled in to the new space, we are working hard to get our web store stocked back up with many new and refined pieces. I feel like we are finally started to develop a very distinct and hopefully timeless style that we can't wait to share with you. Our goal is to be back and live well before Valentine's Day. I hope that you will all plan to visit the web store when that time comes. 

Along with the web store relaunch, we are planning to really amp up the content of our website in 2017. We feel like we have learned a lot since we started P&W and want to share it. We plan to do many more blog posts covering what we have learned about running a cottage industry business, tips about pottery and woodworking, our experience with wholesale, and more. We hope that you subscribe and join in with us. 

Every time that we sell one of our hand crafted pieces, we feel like our enthusiasts get a little piece of us. In that same spirit, we plan to make this blog a place where we share our experiences and our lives. Thank you for spending the last 4 years supporting our adventure. We cannot wait to continue in an even bigger way this new year.

Working hard on new concepts exclusively for our web store. 

Working hard on new concepts exclusively for our web store. 

 

We're Moving & Expanding!

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Hi everyone, 

You may have noticed we have been a bit silent on social media the last few months. Big changes have been in the making. After exploring multiple different options, we have a solid direction forward. Now, we are reaching out to share our exciting news! After months of calculated decision making, we have made a leap to relocate and expand The Potter & Woodsmith. The overwhelming enthusiasm and support that we have received since P&W began in 2013 has left us begging for more production and packing space. That, paired with a very positive new (day) job for our Woodsmith, Steve has lead us closer to Rochester, NY. Our studios will still be located on our own property, but will be GIANT compared to our first space. You will still be able to access our goods through our website, Etsy, in-person markets, and our amazing retail partners. We have no current plans for a traditional "Brick and Mortar". However, if that changes in the future, you will certainly be the first to know! We know that this transition comes at a very busy time and many of you will be looking to purchase holiday gifts with us. Although Etsy and our web shop are currently closed to facilitate the move and wholesale orders, we encourage you to visit our in-person events and retail partner, Terrain as we work diligently to get our direct sales back up and running. Rest assured, that we will be fully operational and better than ever very shortly! We Thank you all so much for your support during this time of transition and can't wait to come back strong with new collections and features in 2017. For any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out. We would be happy to answer your questions. We are currently taking custom and wholesale order requests for an estimated January delivery. 

Thank you all so much, 

Sara & Steve

The Potter & Woodsmith